How chimneys were once a part of Houston’s rich history

Houston, Texas, March 2, 2020 – Houstonians will soon be able to visit the city’s oldest and largest chimney cap and other historic structures at the Museum of the City of Houston.

The Museum of Chimneys, located at 1710 Memorial Drive, will open on April 20 with an exhibit titled “Chimneys of the Past: An Historical Guide,” featuring photographs of Houstonians who built chimneys, their tools and how they were used.

The exhibit is part of the museum’s ongoing efforts to bring visitors back to the city, said Stephanie Luebke, president of the Museum.

“Chimney caps have a special place in our city, and we wanted to explore their history and their history of preservation,” she said.

“This exhibit will bring us back to Houston and to Houstonians and to the history of Houston,” Lueberke said.

The Museum of chimneys will also be exhibiting a large collection of original materials, including original building plans and plans from the early 1900s, as well as photographs of people and events associated with the building.

The museum also will host a lecture series on the history and preservation of Houstons chimneys.

The lecture series, which will include topics including how chimneys are built, what their uses were, and how their preservation is considered, is scheduled for May 17.

“Our goal is to bring people back to this beautiful city,” Loeberke explained.

The Houston Museum of Science and Technology is located in the former Houston Astrodome, which opened in 1901 and is now the Houston Astrophysical Observatory.

The Astrodomest, originally called the Astrodrome, is one of the most well-known landmarks in the city.

It was designed by the architect Frank Lloyd Wright, who was also an architect.

It was designed to house four science facilities: the Southwest Research Institute in Galveston, the Space and Science Institute in Houston, the Harris County Laboratory in Midtown and the Museum Research Institute at the University of Texas at Houston.

The first building was completed in 1909, the last in the 1960s.